News

By Paul Owen and Matthew Weaver, Guardian UK

Pakistani teenager and Indian children’s rights activist beat Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning, the Pope and Vladimir Putin to the prestigious prize

alala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenage education campaigner shot on school bus in 2012 by a Taliban gunman, has won the 2014 Nobel peace prize.

Malala won along with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian children’s rights activist.Read more »

By ADAM LIPTAK

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Thursday evening stopped officials in Wisconsin from requiring voters there to provide photo identification before casting their ballots in the coming election.

Three of the court’s more conservative members dissented, saying they would have allowed officials to require identification.

Around the same time, a federal trial court in Texas struck down that state’s ID law, saying it put a disproportionate burden on minority voters.Read more »

By Greg Sargent, The Washington Post

It’s become a cliche to point out that Democratic hopes of keeping the Senate turn on whether they can mobilize the low and moderate-propensity voters that tend to sit out midterm elections — single women, minorities, younger voters.

But what if Republican state laws restricting voting end up being a key factor in keeping that turnout down — and, by extension, in facilitating a GOP takeover of the Senate?

In a must-read, the New York Times’ Trip Gabriel raises that possibility:Read more »

Court Decisions on Voting Rules Sow Confusion in State Races.

By TRIP GABRIEL

NILES, Ohio — Just weeks before elections that will decide control of the Senate and crucial governors’ races, a cascade of court rulings about voting rules, issued by judges with an increasingly partisan edge, are sowing confusion and changing voting procedures with the potential to affect outcomes in some states.Read more »

By TRIP GABRIEL

NILES, Ohio — Just weeks before elections that will decide control of the Senate and crucial governors’ races, a cascade of court rulings about voting rules, issued by judges with an increasingly partisan edge, are sowing confusion and changing voting procedures with the potential to affect outcomes in some states.Read more »

By Carl Gibson, Reader Supported NewsRead more »

Even if Republicans take the Senate this year, gaining control of both houses of Congress, they won’t gain much in conventional terms: They’re already able to block legislation, and they still won’t be able to pass anything over the president’s veto. One thing they will be able to do, however, is impose their will on the Congressional Budget Office, heretofore a nonpartisan referee on policy proposals.

As a result, we may soon find ourselves in deep voodoo.Read more »

By Naomi Klein, This Changes Everything

Recently, people have been telling me that capitalists are investing lots of money in renewable energy, or that some companies have decided to reduce their environmental impact out of self-interest.

Thanks for the info, guys.

But again, I thought it might be useful to point these people to my book — y’know, since they clearly haven’t read it yet.

For example, this part beginning on page 100:Read more »

The use of vital human antibiotics in livestock is on the rise, the FDA reports

Remember how the federal government decided to finally take on the major threat that antibiotic resistance poses to human health, yet somehow failed to address the meat and poultry industries’ routine overuse of antibiotics — despite acknowledging that said overuse is definitely contributing to the problem? Well, new data out from the FDA shows just how big of an oversight this is. The gist: more antibiotics are being fed to livestock than ever. And you can bet that humans are going to pay the price.Read more »

By Ian Millhiser, ThinkProgress

While many women in Texas were sitting down to dinner, a federal appeals court in Texas drastically reduced their access to reproductive health. In the process, the Court practically begged the Supreme Court to take the case and to narrow abortion rights nationwide. Two judges who are particularly hostile to abortion are responsible for Thursday’s decision limiting abortion rights in Texas. And, it is clear from a single paragraph of their opinion that they are very confident the Supreme Court will take their side if the justices agree to to hear this case.Read more »

By Gail Collins, NY Times

Let¹s consider the walrus crisis.
They¹re piling up in Alaska. About 35,000 walruses have formed what looks to
be a humongous brown ball along the northern coast. A mass of critters,
some weighing 4,000 pounds, are pressed shoulder to shoulder ‹ or flipper to
flipper.
Normally, they¹d be sitting on chunks of ice, periodically flopping into the
water to hunt for snails and clams. But the ice has melted away, and now
they¹re stuck on land.
On the plus side, walruses are gregarious creatures who like to snuggle. TheRead more »