Articles of Interest

By TRIP GABRIEL

NILES, Ohio — Just weeks before elections that will decide control of the Senate and crucial governors’ races, a cascade of court rulings about voting rules, issued by judges with an increasingly partisan edge, are sowing confusion and changing voting procedures with the potential to affect outcomes in some states.Read more »

By Carl Gibson, Reader Supported NewsRead more »

Even if Republicans take the Senate this year, gaining control of both houses of Congress, they won’t gain much in conventional terms: They’re already able to block legislation, and they still won’t be able to pass anything over the president’s veto. One thing they will be able to do, however, is impose their will on the Congressional Budget Office, heretofore a nonpartisan referee on policy proposals.

As a result, we may soon find ourselves in deep voodoo.Read more »

By Naomi Klein, This Changes Everything

Recently, people have been telling me that capitalists are investing lots of money in renewable energy, or that some companies have decided to reduce their environmental impact out of self-interest.

Thanks for the info, guys.

But again, I thought it might be useful to point these people to my book — y’know, since they clearly haven’t read it yet.

For example, this part beginning on page 100:Read more »

The use of vital human antibiotics in livestock is on the rise, the FDA reports

Remember how the federal government decided to finally take on the major threat that antibiotic resistance poses to human health, yet somehow failed to address the meat and poultry industries’ routine overuse of antibiotics — despite acknowledging that said overuse is definitely contributing to the problem? Well, new data out from the FDA shows just how big of an oversight this is. The gist: more antibiotics are being fed to livestock than ever. And you can bet that humans are going to pay the price.Read more »

By Ian Millhiser, ThinkProgress

While many women in Texas were sitting down to dinner, a federal appeals court in Texas drastically reduced their access to reproductive health. In the process, the Court practically begged the Supreme Court to take the case and to narrow abortion rights nationwide. Two judges who are particularly hostile to abortion are responsible for Thursday’s decision limiting abortion rights in Texas. And, it is clear from a single paragraph of their opinion that they are very confident the Supreme Court will take their side if the justices agree to to hear this case.Read more »

By Gail Collins, NY Times

Let¹s consider the walrus crisis.
They¹re piling up in Alaska. About 35,000 walruses have formed what looks to
be a humongous brown ball along the northern coast. A mass of critters,
some weighing 4,000 pounds, are pressed shoulder to shoulder ‹ or flipper to
flipper.
Normally, they¹d be sitting on chunks of ice, periodically flopping into the
water to hunt for snails and clams. But the ice has melted away, and now
they¹re stuck on land.
On the plus side, walruses are gregarious creatures who like to snuggle. TheRead more »

By Sandra Fish, Colorado Public Radio

Monsanto is donating $4.7 million to the campaign to oppose GMO labeling in Colorado.

Monday was the latest deadline for candidates and committees to report campaign contributions and expenditure to the Secretary of State’s office.

Monsanto’s contribution is the largest of the most recent reporting period from Sept. 11 to 24. The St. Louis-based agriculture company is a primary producer of genetically modified seeds.Read more »

By Jules Witcover

WASHINGTON -- In the wake of President Obama's surprising comment to reporters that "we don't have a strategy yet" to deal with the surging terrorist threat of the Islamic State threat in Syria and Iraq, Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Dianne Feinstein has observed: "I've learned one thing about this president, and that is he's very cautious. Maybe, in this instance, too cautious."Read more »

By Heather Saul, The Independent UK

An estimated 35,000 pacific walrus have been spotted ashore on a beach in north-west Alaska.

Unlike seals, the mammals cannot swim indefinitely and are now coming ashore in record numbers as they struggle to find sea ice for resting in the Artic.

They use their tusks to "haul out," or pull themselves onto an ice floe or rocks.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) photographed the huge gathering about five miles north of Point Lay.Read more »

By Charles Pierce, EsquireRead more »

By MARTHA WEINMAN LEAR

IN medical circles, they call it the Hollywood Heart Attack. You’ve seen it: grimace of agony, clutching of chest, sudden collapse, the whole purple-prose panoply.

For my husband, Harold Lear, a doctor who became a patient just that suddenly, it was the first stop in a five-year medical odyssey, one cardiac crisis after another, ending with the ultimate stop in 1978.

Through all the years that followed, it remained my assumption that the Hollywood Heart Attack was it: the paradigm, the norm, the way heart attacks are supposed to happen.Read more »