News

By PAUL KRUGMAN

For more than three decades, almost everyone who matters in American politics has agreed that higher taxes on the rich and increased aid to the poor have hurt economic growth.

Liberals have generally viewed this as a trade-off worth making, arguing that it’s worth accepting some price in the form of lower G.D.P. to help fellow citizens in need. Conservatives, on the other hand, have advocated trickle-down economics, insisting that the best policy is to cut taxes on the rich, slash aid to the poor and count on a rising tide to raise all boats.Read more »

By Thom Hartmann, EcoWatchRead more »

Barbra has officially joined Instagram! Follow her at instagram.com/barbrastreisand!

By Andrea Germanos, Common Dreams

Law requiring abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges "would have the striking result of closing three of Alabama's five abortion clinics," judge rules.

A federal court on Monday ruled that Alabama's law requiring abortion-providing doctors to have admitting privileges at local hospitals is unconstitutional.Read more »

by BARBARA J. KING

For Philip Lymbery, head of the U.K.-based Compassion in World Farming and his co-author Isabel Oakeshott, a visit to California's Central Valley amounted to an encounter with suffering.Read more »

By ROBERT H. FRANK

Each new climate-change study seems more pessimistic than the last. This May and June, for example, were the hottest ones on record for the planet. Storms and droughts occur with increasing frequency. Glaciers are rapidly retreating, portending rising seas that could eventually displace hundreds of millions of people.Read more »

By PAUL KRUGMAN

One of the best insults I’ve ever read came from Ezra Klein, who now is editor in chief of Vox.com. In 2007, he described Dick Armey, the former House majority leader, as “a stupid person’s idea of what a thoughtful person sounds like.”Read more »

By Paul Kane and Ed O'Keefe, The Washington Post

House Republican leaders were ambushed by another conservative insurrection on Thursday, forced to scrap a pivotal vote on a border security bill and scramble to find a solution amid a familiar whirlwind of acrimony and finger-pointing.Read more »

By RT

Residents of a West Virginia town that formerly hosted a Monsanto factory that produced noxious, cancer-causing chemicals can begin receiving assistance promised through a 2012, multi-million-dollar settlement.

A long-promised claims office finally opened up on First Avenue in Nitro, WV on Tuesday this week, meaning residents there will now be able to drop by five-days a week through October 31 in order to learn about what kind of coverage they are eligible to receive.Read more »